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Blabbermouth

The Stranger's week-in-review podcast, in which Eli Sanders, Dan Savage and a group of "experts" explain what just happened in the news, and what it all means. A wide-ranging discussion of everything you need to know in order to pose as an informed, productive member of society!
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Now displaying: December, 2017
Dec 14, 2017
 Dan Savage, Rich Smith, and Eli Sanders are back from their Thanksgiving break and ready to talk about the truly awful Republican tax plan, as well as a related question: Why isn’t there more outrage about it? After that, the New York Times’ controversial profile of an American Nazi in Ohio. Was this a complete journalistic fail? And should you really be cancelling your New York Times subscription over it? Finally, the Washington Post had a pretty great journalistic non-fail this week when it busted a conservative group that was trying to slip Roy Moore-related lies to the Post in order to discredit the paper—and, potentially, Roy Moore’s accusers. The whole ploy centered on a woman who lied to the Post about being impregnated by Moore at age 15 and then having an abortion. Which, of course, led to renewed questions about how far we should go in following the “believe women” slogan. Equally challenging: What to do with Al Franken? He's apologized for past sexual misconduct, he’s had his apology accepted by the woman who first accused him, and he's not heeding calls for his resignation from the US Senate. Plus, as always, the music of Ahamefule J. Oluo!
Dec 13, 2017
This is our last episode of the year—we’ll be back in your earbuds on January 3!—so settle in. We gave you a little extra in this one. First: Dan Savage, Eli Sanders, and Rich Smith look into the historic victory for Democrat Doug Jones in deep red Alabama. What does it mean for the left as we all barrel toward the 2018 midterms? And what do the Alabama exit polls tell us about the kind of Democratic coalition it takes to win tough races? Second: Sydney Brownstone is back to talk about how much credit the #MeToo movement deserves for the stunning Alabama result. Along the way, Sydney also gets into a fascinating back-and-forth with Dan over whether there are any “gray areas” in workplace sexual harassment and what, exactly, a boss should do if she wants to have a respectful, consensual, non-coercive relationship with a subordinate. Finally: Rich Smith takes us through “Cat Person,” the short story that did something short stories never do. It went viral. Bigly. Plus, as always, the music of Ahamefule J. Oluo!
Dec 6, 2017

Wealthy Baby Boomers will be the ones benefiting most from the terrible Republican tax bill that just passed the senate. What does “Barely a Boomer” Dan Savage have to say for his generation? Eli Sanders of Gen-X and Millennial spokesmodel Rich Smith want to know. (Meanwhile, The Atlantic’s Ronald Brownstein thinks he knows exactly what’s going on: “The baby boom is being evicted from the penthouse of American politics. And on the way out, it has decided to trash the place.") Also, in the first run of a new pod moment they're calling Elder Corner, the Blabbermouthers listen to a note from an elder who doesn’t like all this Boomer-blaming. After that, Sydney Brownstone is back to talk about what it’ll mean for the #MeToo movement if Roy Moore wins the Alabama Senate race next week, and what to do with the very different ways Republicans and Democrats are handling sexual harassment allegations. Finally, Dan makes the case that Jill Stein is to blame for any bad outcomes in the gay wedding cake case that’s now before the US Supreme Court and Rich, Eli, and Dan play another round of "Would You Rather?" (Mike Pence or Donald Trump edition.) Plus, as always, the music of Ahamefule J. Oluo. 

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