Info

Blabbermouth

The Stranger's week-in-review podcast, in which Eli Sanders, Dan Savage and a group of "experts" explain what just happened in the news, and what it all means. A wide-ranging discussion of everything you need to know in order to pose as an informed, productive member of society!
RSS Feed
Blabbermouth
2017
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January


2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May


All Episodes
Archives
Now displaying: January, 2017
Jan 25, 2017

Well, here we are: Donald Trump is the President of the United States of America. First on this week’s show, Dan Savage, Rich Smith, and Eli Sanders talk about watching and processing Trump’s inaugural address (and, later, absorbing his continuing assault on verifiable truth). Then Stranger writers Sydney Brownstone and Heidi Groover, who spent four days on the ground in Washington, DC covering the inauguration, tell us about being surrounded by Trump-supporting women, getting teargassed, confronting Neo-Nazis, and being on the streets for the historic Women’s March. Finally, Rich Smith and Stranger film editor Charles Mudede talk about how to turn all this progressive protest energy into actual, meaningful action—and whether the people of the left are really ready to mimic those Charles likes to call “The Tea People.” Plus, as always, the music of Ahamefule J. Oluo.

Jan 18, 2017

This week we recorded live at Town Hall Seattle, with music performed by The Stranger’s Sean Nelson plus a bunch of great guests. First off: Dan Savage, Rich Smith, and myself talk about how it feels to stare down the barrel of the just-days-away Trump presidency, as well as what specific acts of resistance seem most important to us right now. Next: Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal, who was one of the first members of Congress to refuse to attend Trump's inauguration, talks about why she won’t be at Trump’s swearing in, what future impeachment possibilities she’s considering, how we can save the Affordable Care Act, and—with the Women’s March coming on Saturday—wether it’s “women,” “womyn,” or “womxn.” Finally: Before Stranger reporters Sydney Brownstone and Heidi Groover fly off to DC to cover the inauguration, Dan, Rich, and Eli check in with them about how they’re taking in this moment and what they’re hoping to see at the “Make America Great Again Ball." Plus, as always, the music of Ahamefule J. Oluo.

Jan 11, 2017

First up: Dan, Rich, and Eli take on a week of huge, crazy, and sobering news: the Jeff Sessions hearings, the alleged Donald Trump piss tape, Meryl Streep-gate, and President Barack Obama’s farewell address. Next: A reading of a letter from a very special listener. After that: Eric Kanter, the mixed-race resident of Whitefish, Montana, who confronted white supremacist Richard Spencer at a local coffee shop the other day, ultimately telling Spencer to go fuck himself. And finally: Dan, Rich, and Eli discuss “Conflict Is Not Abuse,” a provocative book by Sarah Schulman that argues that a decision to claim victimhood can sometimes be an unhelpful escalation. Plus, as always, the music of Ahamefule J. Oluo.

Jan 4, 2017

Maybe you’ve heard news reports about that small town in Montana where Jewish store owners were targeted by an online Neo-Nazi “troll army” over the holiday season? Yeah, well... that’s where Eli spent his holiday season. On this episode, we talk about that experience—and Eli gets Dan Savage and Rich Smith to weigh in on a moral quandary it raises. After that, live from a property at the center of the ideological firestorm in Whitefish: gay attorney Craig Mungas tells Eli what it’s like to wake up one day and find out you’re renting your law office from the mother of the white supremacist whose presence in Whitefish was one of the sparks for this whole dispiriting episode. Finally, author and social media eminence Lindy West is on to talk about her decision this week to leave Twitter. Plus, as always, the music of Ahamefule J. Oluo.

1