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Blabbermouth

The Stranger's week-in-review podcast, in which Eli Sanders, Dan Savage and a group of "experts" explain what just happened in the news, and what it all means. A wide-ranging discussion of everything you need to know in order to pose as an informed, productive member of society!
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Now displaying: July, 2016
Jul 29, 2016

First, at 2:05, Matt Pearce, national reporter for the L.A. Times, who has covered the clashes at Tahir Square and the protests at Ferguson, describes the kind of protesting he saw outside the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia. In short: things got weird. Then, at 13:41, Stranger reporter Sydney Brownstone tells the story of three more women who have accused tech journalist and former Stranger contributor Matt Hickey of rape. After that, at 20:45, we talk to Natasha Marin, a Seattle artist who created the website Reparations.me, a “social media experiment,” where people of color can request good and services that they need and other can step up to fulfill those requests. Finally, at 34:11, in an extra-special installment of the Stranger “critics pick” section, Jen Graves tells you how to prepare for the Seattle Art Fair, as well as the glut of other art events, coming up next weekend. Plus, as always, the music of Ahamefule J. Oluo. 

Jul 22, 2016

What’s it like to spend an entire week marinating in a sour brew of Republican sweat, misogynist anti-Hillary swag, condescension dripped from the mouths of protesters and counter-protesters alike, and whiskey, lots of whiskey? Stranger writers Sydney Brownstone and Heidi Groover were in Cleveland this week for the chaotic coronation of Donald Trump and they tell us exactly what it was like, day by day, with their diary of a mad convention. After that, the critics of The Stranger are back, as always, to tell you what to do this weekend. Plus the music of Ahamefule J. Oluo! 

Jul 15, 2016

“This goddamn week,” as Stranger writer Larry Mizel has described it—we’re gonna talk about it. First, at 1:13, Marcus Harrison Green, the founder of the South Seattle Emerald, will talk about the painful swirl of emotions he felt at a July 7 vigil held at Westlake Plaza in response to the police shooting deaths of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling. Then, at 16:16, Stranger visual art critic Jen Graves discusses the woman she calls The Queen Protester, Iesha Evans, whose image was part of a viral Reuters photograph you probably saw this week—Iesha standing regally at a Black Lives Matter protest in Baton Rouge, nice dress billowing slightly, while panicky cops in full body armor move toward her, or maybe fall away from her. After that, at 26:59, we turn to some things we can maybe fix locally, with our votes, as we celebrate the arrival of The Stranger’s endorsements for the August 2 primary! Ballots should be in your mailbox right now. Finally, at 30:44, the critics of The Stranger tell you what to do this weekend. Plus, as always, the music of Ahamefule J. Oluo. 

Jul 1, 2016

On this Fourth of July weekend, between all the booze and fireworks, I want to offer you something to ponder: What would it actually mean to make real political progress in America? Or, to drop one of Seattle’s favorite terms into this question, what does it mean to be “progressive”? On this show we’ll be asking that question in the context of the fascinating race to replace long-serving Seattle Congressman Jim McDermott. At 1:55, a University of Washington professor will talk about the historical roots of the word “progressive” and how it’s been adapted for our era. Then we’ll hear from the three leading “progressive” candidates to replace Jim McDermott, all of whom say they’re the single most progressive person running. At 13:17, Pramila Jayapal will make her case. Then, at 21:45, Brady Walkinshaw. And finally, at 32:17, Joe McDermott. After that, at 40:22, Jim McDermott gets on the line from Washington, DC and offers the definition for “progressive” that he’s arrived at after many, many decades in politics. Plus, as always, the music of Ahamefule J. Oluo.

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