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Blabbermouth

The Stranger's week-in-review podcast, in which Eli Sanders, Dan Savage and a group of "experts" explain what just happened in the news, and what it all means. A wide-ranging discussion of everything you need to know in order to pose as an informed, productive member of society!
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Now displaying: June, 2015
Jun 26, 2015

Pride weekend is upon us, so we asked Mayor Ed Murray—Seattle's first out, gay mayor—to come in and talk about the way Capitol Hill used to be. Like, in 1984 when Murray moved moved back to Seattle and started renting a room in the gay-friendly-ish neighborhood for a few hundred dollars. Murray talks about what's changed on the hill since then (beyond, obviously, rents) and weighs in on whether the LGBT community really needs a "gay ghetto" anymore. We also talk to Jason Schmidt, author of A List of Things That Didn't Kill Me, a new memoir that's set in 1980s Capitol Hill. His book centers, in part, around his gay father who was then dying of AIDS. Schmidt remembers several-hundred-dollar rents, too, and like Murray tackles the question of whether the neighborhood has changed for the better. Plus the music of Blood Drugs, a heavy/metal band that'll be playing at the Capitol Hill Block Party next month!

Jun 19, 2015

This week we talk to Seattle City Council member Mike O'Brien, who paddled out into Puget Sound recently to try to stop a Shell Oil rig from heading off to drill in the Arctic. He was hauled off the water by the US Coast Guard in the process, detained, and charged $250—along with a number of other activists. "Why is the law protecting Shell Oil but not the planet?" O'Brien asks. He says he'll do everything in his power to prevent Shell from returning back to Seattle after the summer Arctic drilling season is over. And Rich Smith is back on the show to talk about a big week in national politics—Hillary Clinton's "populist" speech in NYC, Jeb! Bush's campaign launch in Florida, and Donald Trump's amazing escalator ride into the Republican pack. Plus, the very first recording from a Seattle band called Draemhouse, which was formed out of the recently-broken-up Seattle band Rose Windows.

Jun 12, 2015

 

It's our 10th Anniversary special! Ten episodes of this podcast and we're still not canceled, so it's time to celebrate with University of Washington meteorologist Cliff Mass, who's on the show to argue with The Stranger's Sydney Brownstone over how best to talk about climate change (and whether ocean acidification is a real and present problem). Josh Feit, of PubliCola and Seattle Met Magazine, is also on the show to offer a theory about socialist City Council member Kshama Sawant's defacto support for the home-owning class—and to explain this great album of his, Teenage Machine Age, which was recorded in the 80s and 90s and then recently found in the back of a Stranger desk. We listen to Josh's album, and then we go on a road trip through the brain of Rich Smith, who just drove out to Seattle from Missouri to write about the local literary scene and national politics for the paper. Happy anniversary!

Jun 5, 2015

June 5, 2015

This week we talk to Dylan Orr, the man who was just picked to enforce Seattle's trailblazing $15 minimum wage law. He's a trailblazer himself, having served as the first transgender presidential appointee in US history before accepting this new job (in which he'll become the first transgender mayoral appointee to a cabinet-level position in Seattle history). Jen Graves, the Stranger's art critic, is also on the show talking about big staffing changes—and related gender and race concerns—at the University of Washington's art department. Plus, what Jen's looking at lately and the music of the Wimps, a "sweet 'n' sour" punk band from Seattle. 

 

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